Curated by
FINAL THOUGHTS
There is obviously much more that can be said about all of these artists, and I have just provided a limited introduction to each. I would like to refrain from drawing conclusions, but would like to ...
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There is obviously much more that can be said about all of these artists, and I have just provided a limited introduction to each. I would like to refrain from drawing conclusions, but would like to share some final thoughts after going through this process.

Although each of these artists have very different backgrounds and work within a range of media, I find it fascinating they are all drawn to working with the same basic fabric - Toile de Jouy - and yet still have such a varied responses to this fabric. Some of them are working within the decorative arts tradition, while others in a fine arts tradition; some intend to have a deep impact on the viewer and to raise questions about representations of race, while others want to have a lighter and humorous impact; some use the fabric more as a backdrop, while others use it as more of the focus of their work. This list could go on, but the common theme is that they they are each modifying the original fabric in their own way - taking a decorative element from 18th century France and giving it meaning beyond the aesthetic for a 21st century audience.
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02-04 jul 2014

curated by

Becky Benshoof

Pasadena

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Becky Benshoof is living in Los Angeles and has been working in art administration.

She received her MA in Art His ...
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Becky Benshoof is living in Los Angeles and has been working in art administration.

She received her MA in Art History and Visual Culture from Richmond University in London, and her BA with Honers in Art History and a Certificate in European Studies from the University of Wisconsin, Madison.

She has worked at Curatorial Assistance, Sarah Myerscough Gallery, The Victoria and Albert Museum, The Chazen Museum of Art, and the Los Angeles Art Association.

Her academic and curatorial interests include artists who focus on 18th and 19th century themes and motifs - based on a fundamental belief that it is necessary to understand, reevaluate, and reconsider the past in order to understand the present, and see how historical trends have shaped and constructed present ideologies.
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SHEILA BRIDGES
She describes Harlem Toile as “designed to tell a somewhat satirical story about African American life as seen through the sometimes distorted lens of the media.” Bridges again makes viewers reconsid ...
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She describes Harlem Toile as “designed to tell a somewhat satirical story about African American life as seen through the sometimes distorted lens of the media.” Bridges again makes viewers reconsider the original fabric and its cultural implications, while working within the tradition of interior design – her designs are not intended to be displayed in museums and gallery’s but are for the home. Yet, that’s not to say their effect is any less powerful or meaningful.

Image: Sheila Bridges Harlem Toile De Jouy Limited Edition High Ball Drinking Glasses Each set of six glasses contains 6 different vignettes from the original wallpaper design. 6 1/2" high | 2 3/8" diameter | Dishwasher safe
From designers website: http://www.sheilabridges.com/ht_glasses.php
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SHEILA BRIDGES
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SHEILA BRIDGES
Sheila Bridges is an established interior designer and was named “America’s Best Interior Designer” by Time Magazine in 2001. After searching for the perfect Toile for own home and not being able to ...
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Sheila Bridges is an established interior designer and was named “America’s Best Interior Designer” by Time Magazine in 2001. After searching for the perfect Toile for own home and not being able to find it, she created her own toile designs and fabric. Her Harlem Toile de Jouy line began as a wall covering and then became a fabric as well and a decorative motifs for glasses and plates. Rather than the traditional pastoral scenes, Bridges draws on other 18th century motifs, as her characters represent the aristocracy, but they are black.

Image: Detail of Cherry Harlem Toile De Jouy Wallpaper
From designers website http://www.sheilabridges.com/wallpaper_ht.php
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SHEILA BRIDGES
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RICHARD SAJA
Richard Saja is an artist and designer with a background in textile design. His work with Toile began years ago as a cushion BUSINESS called "Historically Inaccurate Decorative Arts." Saja embroider ...
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Richard Saja is an artist and designer with a background in textile design. His work with Toile began years ago as a cushion BUSINESS called "Historically Inaccurate Decorative Arts." Saja embroiders his own designs directly onto Toile fabric interacting with the stories and characters already there. He incorporates whimsical embellishments and bold colors to alter the subject matter of the fabric into something fun, unique, and unexpected.

Image: Scenes from a Marriage, 2013/14, 36 x 42, cotton floss on cotton/linen. Made for the 2014 Textile Biennial in Philadelphia.
From artist's blog: http://historically-inaccurate.blogspot.com/
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RICHARD SAJA
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More on Both RENÉE GREEN and The Image of The Black in Western Art
http://newsoffice.mit.edu/2013/shifting-mental-spaces

http://act.mit.edu/people/professors/renee-green/

http://www.imageoftheblack.com/general-editors.html
RENÉE GREEN: MISE-EN-SCÈNE: COMMEMORATIVE TOILE
In this work Green not only transforms our ideas of the traditional toile fabric, but uses her fabric as a way to remind viewers that much of our history has been told from a particular perspective – ...
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In this work Green not only transforms our ideas of the traditional toile fabric, but uses her fabric as a way to remind viewers that much of our history has been told from a particular perspective – the wealthy, white, male – while other minority experiences and perspectives have been overlooked.

Image: Mise-en-Scène: Commemorative Toile, 1992 (detail). Pigment on cotton sateen. Width: 57 inches (144.78 cm)

http://www.fabricworkshopandmuseum.org/

Read more about this artwork
http://www.fabricworkshopandmuseum.org/Artists/
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RENÉE GREEN: MISE-EN-SCÈNE: COMMEMORATIVE TOILE
RENÉE GREEN: MISE-EN-SCÈNE: COMMEMORATIVE TOILE
Green is an artist, filmmaker, writer, and the Director of MIT’s program Art, Culture, and Technology. Green works in a wide range of media to explore a number of issues - but more specific to this ...
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Green is an artist, filmmaker, writer, and the Director of MIT’s program Art, Culture, and Technology. Green works in a wide range of media to explore a number of issues - but more specific to this discussion ones of class and race – and how these cultural identities have been shaped historically.

Her work Mise-en-Scène: Commemorative Toile (1992) Is an installation, arranged as a stylized parlor, in which she has used Toile to upholster all the furniture, wallpaper and drapes. Yet upon a closer look it is clear that the traditional and bucolic scenes from the original fabric have been replaced by and mixed with scenes from antebellum South in the U.S. and colonial Europe. Specifically, she replaced some of the original vignettes with images she discovered in the groundbreaking book The Image of the Black in Western Art (Harvard University, 1989).

Image: Mise-en-Scène: Commemorative Toile, 1992. Pigment on cotton sateen upholstered furniture, and pigment on paper-backed cotton sateen wallpaper.

Dimensions vary with installation.

http://www.fabricworkshopandmuseum.org/
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RENÉE GREEN: MISE-EN-SCÈNE: COMMEMORATIVE TOILE
TIM HAILAND ON HIS TOILE DE JOUY SERIES
"I suppose that my subjects are, for me, idealized versions of themselves, just as toile de Jouy fabric represented a romanticized interpretation of pastoral ‘reality’ in late-18th century France."

...
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"I suppose that my subjects are, for me, idealized versions of themselves, just as toile de Jouy fabric represented a romanticized interpretation of pastoral ‘reality’ in late-18th century France."

Article: Behind the Viel with Tim Hailand – Installation Magazine, Feb 27th 2014

http://installationmag.com/behind-the-veil-with-tim-hailand/
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Tim Hailand
His work is very process driven, as he took time experimenting with the process of printing directly on to the fabric. Some of the themes his work includes are the element of chance, the dichotomy of ...
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His work is very process driven, as he took time experimenting with the process of printing directly on to the fabric. Some of the themes his work includes are the element of chance, the dichotomy of inside vs. outside, and ideas of performance.

Image: Tim Hailand, Michel in Claude Monet’s greenhouse Giverny (on black mythical toile), digital pigment print on patterned toile de Jouy fabric, 25″ x 19″, unique print, 2012

Courtesy of Artist

http://www.timhailand.com/
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Tim Hailand
tim Hailand
Photographer, Tim Hailand was inspired to work with Toile de Jouy after he was awarded residency at Giverny (Claude Monet’s home and gardens) in 2012. His room was covered in a red pastoral Toile and ...
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Photographer, Tim Hailand was inspired to work with Toile de Jouy after he was awarded residency at Giverny (Claude Monet’s home and gardens) in 2012. His room was covered in a red pastoral Toile and because of the cold and rainy weather in Normandy he spent much of his time within this room and was left to ponder the scenes on his walls.
It was under these circumstances he decided to print his photographs on Toile. He Chooses subjects that are heroic to him - they are usually performers that range from artists, actors, models, and musicians.

Image: Tim Hailand, Dan face vineyard Vienna (on Red Indian toile), digital pigment print on patterned toile de Jouy fabric, 44″ x 29″, Unique print, 2012

Courtesy of Artist

http://www.timhailand.com/
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tim Hailand
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Background of Toile De Jouy
Bavarian engraver and colorist Christophe-Philippe Oberkampf Jouy-en-Josas, set up his factory in France near river ‘La Bièvre’ because it was well-known for its chemical properties that worked well w ...
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Bavarian engraver and colorist Christophe-Philippe Oberkampf Jouy-en-Josas, set up his factory in France near river ‘La Bièvre’ because it was well-known for its chemical properties that worked well with washing fabric. Production began in 1760 and the business quickly grew and became very successful. ‘Toile de Jouy’ became a term that refers to this style of printed cotton that was made in factories throughout France and was very fashionable throughout the 19th century.

Designs range from characters and scenes inspired from novels, operas, and legends. They also include mythical scenes, floral designs, and country pastoral settings, which often give the impression of bucolic simplicity.

Read more about the history and production techniques of Toile de Jouy on these sites

http://www.toilesdejouydecoration.fr/uk/historique.htm

http://www.toilesdejouylauthentique.fr/uk/toile-de-jouy.php

Image: Four Seasons Pattern. From http://www.toilesdejouylauthentique.fr/uk/
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Background of Toile De Jouy
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Introduction: Working with Toile De Jouy
Generally, I am drawn to artists who use historical themes and motifs in their work, specifically 18th and 19th century Europe. I believe it is important to understand, reevaluate, and reconsider the ...
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Generally, I am drawn to artists who use historical themes and motifs in their work, specifically 18th and 19th century Europe. I believe it is important to understand, reevaluate, and reconsider the past in order to understand the present, and see how historical trends have shaped and constructed present ideologies.

I would like to spend my time on ‘Curated By’ focusing on a selection of artists who work with Toile de Jouy (a French fabric developed in the mid-18th century). These artists will include Tim Hailand, Renee Green, Richard Saja, and Shelia Bridges. I would like to explore the different ways these artists have worked with toile and their purposes for doing so. Each artist, in their own way, has taken a fabric that is traditionally seen as pretty and decorative, even boring to some, and has turned it on its head and given it a new meaning. They not only make the viewer take note of their final product – the dialogue between the past and present, but also make us reevaluate the medium and fabric itself.

I would also like to use this as an opportunity to leave this open to interpretation and discussion; I am in no way trying to tie this up neatly with concrete answers.
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ON THE ROAD 5 / TOP OF MOUNT LEE / 20140517
Elly Ward/Ordinary Architecture’s “Falling Icon”

Photo © Jaime Kowal.
ON THE ROAD 5 / TOP OF MOUNT LEE / 20140517
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30-01 jul 2014

curated by

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On the Road is a yearlong series of exhibitions and conversations that highlights contemporary architectural practice ...
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On the Road is a yearlong series of exhibitions and conversations that highlights contemporary architectural practice in Los Angeles. On the Road is a platform for new ways of thinking and making that engages both a discipline and culture with contemporary ideas about architecture, design, and art; acknowledging that there are shared interests and overlaps, but also distinct personalities and pursuits. The series is invested in dialogues. Each program takes place at a distinct venue throughout the city and is seen as a vehicle for advancing the positions of young architects, artists, and designers, and at times blurring their distinctions and encouraging them to carpool.

Organized by Danielle Rago / Curator, Courtney Coffman / Editor, Jonathan Louie / Protagonist, and James Michael Tate / Instigator.

Danielle Rago is an independent curator in New York City and Los Angeles. She is also a freelance contributor to a number of international publications on art, architecture, and design. She has worked with the Metropolitan Museum of Art and the Guggenheim Museum in New York and the A+D Museum and MAK Center in Los Angeles. Her writing has been published in Abitare, The Architect’s Newspaper, Architectural Record, CLOG, Domus, LOG: Observations on Contemporary
Architecture and the City, PIN-UP, TANK, and WIRED Magazine, among others. Danielle holds a Master’s degree in Architecture History and Critical Thinking from
the Architectural Association, London.

Courtney Coffman is a designer and writer based in Los Angeles. Her focus
is on contemporary architecture with an interest in Visual Culture through the lens of history, theory and interdisciplinary bisects. Currently completing her Master of Arts in Architecture on the disciplinary overlaps between contemporary architecture and avant-garde fashion in UCLA’s A.UD Critical Studies program, she previously received both a Master of Architectural Studies in Criticism from the Knowlton School of Architecture and a Bachelor of Science in Design with honors from the College of the Arts at The Ohio State University.

Jonathan Louie is an Assistant Professor of Architecture at Syracuse University.
He has previously worked for RE X and MVRDV and his graduate studies were done at the University of California Los Angeles where he graduated with distinction
and is the recipient of the 2x8 Award and University Fellowship. His writings and work have popped up in the LA Times, Disegno, L’Architecture d’Aujoud’jui, The Architects Newspaper, the A+D Museum, and PLAT.

James Michael Tate is the founder of T8projects, an architecture studio in Los
Angeles. He is an instructor at the Woodbury University School of Architecture. Tate has previously worked at Michael Maltzan Architecture and MOS Architects, and taught at the Rice University School of Architecture. His academic and professional work has been exhibited and published widely. Tate holds a Bachelor of Environmental Design from Texas A&M University, a certificate from the Auburn University Rural Studio, and a Master of Architecture degree from the Yale University School of Architecture.
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ON THE ROAD 5 / TOP OF MOUNT LEE / 20140517
Elly Ward/Ordinary Architecture’s “Falling Icon”

Photo © Jaime Kowal.
ON THE ROAD 5 / TOP OF MOUNT LEE / 20140517
ON THE ROAD 5 / TOP OF MOUNT LEE / 20140517
Elly Ward/Ordinary Architecture’s “Falling Icon”

Photo © Jaime Kowal.
ON THE ROAD 5 / TOP OF MOUNT LEE / 20140517
ON THE ROAD 5 / TOP OF MOUNT LEE / 20140517
Narineh Mirzaeian’s “Double Take”

Photo © Jaime Kowal.
ON THE ROAD 5 / TOP OF MOUNT LEE / 20140517
ON THE ROAD 5 / TOP OF MOUNT LEE / 20140517
Narineh Mirzaeian’s installation “Double Take”

Photo © Jaime Kowal.
ON THE ROAD 5 / TOP OF MOUNT LEE / 20140517
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ON THE ROAD 5 / TOP OF MOUNT LEE / 20140517
Nick Hanna’s “57 Orange Houses”

Photo © Nick Hanna.
ON THE ROAD 5 / TOP OF MOUNT LEE / 20140517
Stina Gustafsson likes this.
ON THE ROAD 5 / TOP OF MOUNT LEE / 20140517
Nick Hanna’s “57 Orange Houses”

Photo © Nick Hanna.
ON THE ROAD 5 / TOP OF MOUNT LEE / 20140517
Stina Gustafsson likes this.
ON THE ROAD 5 / TOP OF MOUNT LEE / 20140517
Corey Fogel plays his stringed instruments

Photo © Jaime Kowal.
ON THE ROAD 5 / TOP OF MOUNT LEE / 20140517